YAHOO’S SHAMELESS DISTORTION OF THE NEWS TO FAVOR THE NRA

We all know that most of the media is owned by a handful of people or corporations (e.g., General Electric owns NBC and Rupert Murdoch, FOX), and that nearly all media are run by ideological right-wing Republicans; and we all know further that the last thing right-wing Republicans offer the public is impartiality of news and commentary. (Fox News is its own best witness to this shameful fact.) But Google-owned Yahoo—solidly in the right-wing camp as any perusal of its on-line news reporting and commentary can verify—shamelessly left out 50% of the recent Santa Barbara shooting story.

A father of one of the students who was murdered spoke to the press about the pain and grief of his son’s death, and of his anger at the politicians who refused to pass gun restriction laws after the killings at Sandy Hook, CT.  Yahoo left out, conspicuously, the father’s loud and very emotional condemnation of the NRA for its role in facilitating gun violence .Because his “whole body and soul” anger at the NRA was so visceral, visibly shaking every fiber in his grief-torn body, it is all the more surprising that this was edited out of the story so that not one mention was made of the NRA! Yahoo’s reporter, Dana Feldman, is either completely incompetent as a journalist or else (more likely) was instructed by her superiors to edit the father’s speech so as not to blame the NRA.

Is there anywhere in the US where the NRA’s influence does NOT extend? The Right has complained about Big Government’s influence in our everyday life. But government’s influence is nothing compared to the NRA’s. Ironically, the Tea Party folk—NRA advocates one and all—support a movement that is profoundly un-democratic! It is their patrons—the wealthiest 1%–who now rule undemocratically. But they are too blind to see it—or they approve of it.

The anguish of Mr. Martinez, the dead boy’s father, could have turned even hearts of stone to wax—except of course those of the NRA, with its many psychopathological gun enthusiasts.          These people suffer from a combination of several severe psychological disorders. They evidence an utter lack of emotional maturity and self-confident masculinity; they possess a grossly underdeveloped intellect, and with no ability to reason logically; they have no capability to empathize with others; and, additionally, they suffer from paranoia and grandiose narcissism.

As Jesus knew only too well, it is all too easy to bring violence and hate into the world; but the kingdom of heaven is reserved for peacemakers.  It’s peopled only by  those who bring love and mercy,  goodness and truth,  to our harsh and broken world. Of that unimaginably beautiful world, God’s kingdom, where reason and love rule high and low, the NRA and its proselytes can have no part, for they fundamentally oppose His  message of a kingdom of Peace, Non-violence, and Love. Heaven is for those who have practiced God’s love in this life through endless trials: hell, for those who have rejected God’s love for lust of violence and hate.

The NRA, through its lobbying, exercises almost absolute power in Congress and across America. Chris Christie, the Republican governor of New Jersey, just vetoed a modest gun proposal that would have limited the number of shells in a gun clip. Not even that (token) gun measure gets passed due to the power of the NRA. No doubt Gov. Christie heard the “clink, clink, clink” of campaign cash contributions as he signed his name, vetoing the bill. “You scratch my back, I scratch yours.” And if this further imperils our nation’s children—well, so much the worse for our children!

Len Sive Jr.

THE RESURGENCE OF UNTRAMMELED POWER OF RUSSIA AND CHINA

When the Berlin Wall fell, its crashing din was heard around the world: and for millions of people it was music to their ears. This was not just any event—here was final proof that the evil and, what was equally important politically and economically, the utter impracticality of Communism could not be sustained because it ran directly counter to human nature. Its rhetoric, of course, like all propaganda, was positive and hopeful, but its reality proved altogether different. In practice, Communism created even more injustice, more absurdities, more practical problems, more suffering and death in history by far than any other economic or political system. Communism, and its historical partner in unequalled savagery, Nazism, will for all time remain lasting monuments of unexampled hubris, unreason, atheism, and unalloyed evil. If some men and women can be saints, these two movements show starkly that under their influence many more can become devils.

While history does indeed appear to show that the rich inherently seek ever more power and wealth at the expense of the middle- and lower-classes (without of course ever acknowledging such), the utopian image of Communism set up unique expectations of an everlasting earthly Paradise: where mankind would now be free of avarice, of cruelty to his fellow man, and of the naked lust for power. Communism’s power was that it proclaimed a new humanity. But in reality, of course, it could accomplish no such thing. For human nature doesn’t change. The old class structure was replaced by a new (Communist) class structure. The freedoms, and limitations, of the old system were swallowed up in an all-embracing savage totalitarianism.  Big Brother had arrived. The Utopia so blindly hoped for, and believed in, was revealed to be just another earthly hell from which millions sought to escape—so many in fact that Communism had to build walls to lock its people in, which is why its sudden, dramatic crashing downfall was the cause of such hysterical jubilation world-wide.

Now we see, in both China and Russia, a new era of libido dominandi—of the lust for power. Of course, they can’t and won’t publicly declare this—since when does evil ever speak the truth?  Still, evil, in its unconscious bow to goodness and reason, must pretend at least to operate under the highest motives; but its actions show unequivocally that power and domination are China’s and Russia’s twin goals.

Russia’s motives revolve around pure power. Putin (and Russia’s military) doesn’t want Russia to be thought of as a second-rate military power—and, being the little man that he is, personally wants to be accorded respect, as well as to be feared, by the world, but especially by the US. It wants a share in world dominion; and it chafes under the greater economic and military power (and he would add hubris) of the US. Putin is a small man with a large ego. He cares little about his own people or their future, otherwise he would develop, or allow to be developed, Russia’s economy in all of its diversity instead of making it depend entirely upon the exportation of oil and gas as it now does. In this Putin shows himself to be anything but a statesman, or to have any other real goals than power for power’s sake. He hears the siren call of libido dominandi. And in this he adds his name to an endless list of tyrants in history.

China has a similar desire to dominate. But unlike Russia, which is trying to relive the good old days of Soviet domination, China seeks world power in large part to make itself an irresistible economic powerhouse. It has now, and will have much more in the future, great economic problems at home it must deal with: lack of vital minerals, oil, gas, etc.; millions of homes, buildings, and schools that are unsoundly built and therefore vulnerable to earthquakes or other natural disasters; lakes and rivers dried or drying up; forests denuded; corruption top to bottom; pollution of unimaginable intensity and duration, etc.  China, for political as well as military reasons, doesn’t want to be dependent on the outside world. So it seeks regional domination in order to remain the economic engine of Asia, and will enforce that superiority militarily more and more over time. Its words do not match its actions: its rhetoric is peace and conciliation, but its actions spell confrontation and conflict. Once China gets used to exercising the full panoply of power throughout Asia, it will add world dominion to its desiderata.

The world fondly hopes, and fondly believes, that war, especially world war, is an outworn relic of a bygone era; that the human race, having endured so much suffering and death in the last century, has finally come to its senses and will neither engage in nor permit another such global tragedy.  But the storm clouds of war are slowly gathering once again. Communism, past (Russia) and present (China), is not yet finished cursing the world.  Incalculable suffering, in Europe near the former Soviet Union and in Asia, is only a misstep away. Tyrants—Xi Jinping of China and Putin of Russia—are strutting the world’s stage once again. The lessons of history have already been forgotten. And so, pronounced Santayana, we shall be forced to repeat them.

Len Sive Jr.

VOYEURISM AND THE FAILED AMERICAN EDUCATION SYSTEM

A few days ago at San Diego’s Woodland Middle School, in health class, 8th grade students were asked to stand under signs that indicated how far they would go sexually when they started dating. The signs read variously “Hugging,” “Kissing,” “Above the Waist”, “Below the Waist,” and “All the Way.”

So, here you are in 8th grade, at a notoriously awkward age, not yet dating, and you are to tell the entire class (and via rumor, the entire school!) how you might behave sexually in the future! This artful little game was something the “innovative” principal, Brian Randall, found in a community clinic, which was his defense in using it. (Randall’s logic: It comes from a community clinic; all things from a community clinic are educationally valuable; since this comes from a community clinic, it must be educationally valuable.) This exercise was billed as a way for parent-child communications to be opened up. How exactly that might happen was left unexplained.

And more to the point, how does this school arrogate to itself the right to ask questions proper only within the family (and most decidedly not in front of other students and staff!) or between a licensed therapist and his or her client?

I should like the school to put up signs for principals like Brian Randall to stand under (“I found this one at a community clinic, so it must be good”). Here are the signs: “I have not yet committed adultery, but I’m thinking about it,” “I have committed adultery, but regret it,” “I have committed adultery and enjoyed it,” and “Fidelity in marriage should be optional.”  This little game of mine, by the way, is “to open up communications between husband and wife.”

Just imagine this game: all the teachers are there, their spouses, the janitors even, perhaps a reporter or two (our rumor mill). And you must stand under one of the signs before the curious gaze of everyone present. Now it’s only a guess, mind you, but I think there might be one or two who would balk at playing this game, with privacy being the reason given.

Such “New Age” educational material is one reason why our school system is so poor; why we test almost last in comparison with other nations, developing and developed; why the media now broadcasts on a 5th grade level (news broadcasters, unfortunately, seem hardly better educated than that themselves!); and why we now see the dumbest productions on TV and in the movies.

Woodland’s descent into voyeuristic games in health class must surely be an indicator of the school’s overall intellectual quality. Do they teach Latin or Greek there, or French or German?  I would be very surprised if they did.  Can the students read good books (“Classics”) with both edification and enjoyment? Can they write well? Do they know how to diagram a sentence? How well prepared are they for entering high school? If Brian Randall’s use of logic is itself any indication, the intellectual strength of the school is on the short side of rigor and excellence.

The hard work of learning Latin in middle school or high school is today mostly just a memory, and yet those few students today who do take Latin easily outscore their non-Latin peers on standardized tests. The time taken to learn Latin rather than time spent on embarrassing voyeuristic “games” would aid a student incalculably more.

But one thing you can bet on from Principal Brian Randall, the path that should be taken to improve his school will not be taken. Why not? Because in response to parental criticism, he simply turned defiant and refused to take their criticism seriously.  In his mind there is no other truth than his own.  But as Socrates taught us two and a half millennia ago, real education is the search for Truth (not a defense of one’s opinions), but this presupposes humility and openness, neither of which Randall appears to possess. Since a school’s educational philosophy is largely determined by its principal’s, one may assume from Brian Randall’s defiant close-mindedness  that there is no great love of Truth at Woodland Middle School, and this would inevitably color what, and how,  a school teaches.

Our American education system is broken. One way to judge this is to look at the effects of science on our views of the universe. And what do we find? Science for half the country has had little discernible effect. 46% of American adults believe that the universe is 10,000 years old or younger. This view is called Creationism, which also advocates that God created the universe, as well as the first humans ( Adam and Eve), in just 7 days! It’s as if no progress in science has been made in the last 3000 years! Intellectually, there are many in the United States who are still in the Dark Ages! One often reads a lament about how we are not training scientists today. With Creationism believed so widely, one can see why the sciences have taken a back seat to unreasoning belief. The Bible is not and was never meant to be a scientific handbook. It is a book about God’s sovereignty (Genesis, Exodus)—a “Who the final authority is and our relationship to Him” and not a detailing “How the universe was created,” which is and ever will be a complete mystery, all the present and future scientific advances notwithstanding.

This simple fact, however, is too scary for the average Creationist to believe. Their faith is not strong enough to hold the sacred cup of mystery, their narrow minds too desiccated for the rich luxuriance of metaphor and symbol. Mankind is homo symbolicus; the Creationist on the other hand is homo timidus. But where there is no courage, there can be no true or lasting knowledge. The search for Truth is not for the faint of heart. To be numbered among God’s true followers is an essay in courage—and an adventure not of the spirit only but also of the mind. Only those who courageously  seek Truth truly live, truly embody the spirit of God. The fearful shall never enter the Kingdom of Heaven.

Woodland Middle School shows graphically how our education system is a failed enterprise. The reasons are many, however, and transcend easy criticism of Brian Randall. But he is surely part of the problem. He sets the school’s tone. In approving of a 14-year-old declaring publically what he or she would do sexually in the future is both pathologically voyeuristic, potentially psychologically harmful, inexpressibly inappropriate, as well as a bellwether of the continuing decline of the American education system.

Len Sive Jr.

UNA PIETRA SULL’AGENTE ORANGE?

Il Vietnam tra Stati Uniti e Cina

Agosto è mese di molteplici anniversari, per lo più riguardanti misfatti e catastrofi del “socialismo realizzato”, ovvero del defunto mondo comunista. Siamo arrivati al cinquantenario del Muro di Berlino, innalzato per troncare le fughe in massa dalla Repubblica democratica tedesca e perciò oggetto di facili irrisioni da parte dei vignettisti, tipo “stiamo edificando il socialismo, mattone dopo mattone”. Sono appena trascorsi, poi, 43 anni dall’invasione sovietica della Cecoslovacchia, colpevole di tentata transizione ad un “socialismo dal volto umano”. E 23 anni più tardi quello dal volto non umanizzato scontava i suoi peccati con il crollo dell’URSS in seguito ad un altro tentativo riformista avviato da Michail Gorbaciov.

Va d’altronde annotato che il conseguente trionfo paneuropeo della controparte democratica e più o meno capitalista stenta a produrre frutti incondizionatamente apprezzabili nelle vaste terre già dominate direttamente o indirettamente dal Cremlino. Persino nell’ex RDT, ricongiuntasi all’altra Germania per condividere libertà e prosperità, non pochi tuttora rimpiangono (sarebbe la cosiddetta Ostalgie) il regime che si proteggeva sparando su quanti cercavano di scavalcare il Muro. E che, per la verità, si consolidò via via anche con opere più creative, trasformando la Germania-est in una sorta di vetrina del “campo socialista”.

Le suddette ricorrenze di piena estate non devono comunque indurre ad dimenticarne o ignorarne altre riguardanti invece le magagne dei trionfatori del 1989-1991. Un trionfo che, come si sa, avvenne soprattutto se non esclusivamente in Europa. Quanto all’Asia, oggi si parla spesso del Vietnam, che si riunificò ben prima della Germania e ben diversamente da essa, ossia con l’annessione della sua parte meridionale a quella settentrionale sotto regime comunista, al termine di una lunga guerra, diciamo pure di popolo, con gli Stati Uniti, uscitine perdenti nonostante la dovizia di mezzi di ogni genere impiegati per vincerla.

Tuttora ufficialmente comunista come la Cina, il Vietnam vanta una crescita economica poco meno strabiliante di quella del grande vicino e difesa efficacemente, sinora, dai contraccolpi della crisi planetaria degli ultimi anni. Il paese è ancora relativamente povero, ma la sua popolazione, un po’ più numerosa e molto più giovane di quella tedesca, sembra dotata anche in tempo di pace di energie e risorse non inferiori a quelle esibite in tempo di guerra, che consentirono tra l’altro di respingere con successo anche un violento attacco cinese dopo le vittorie militari sulla Francia e sugli Stati Uniti. Il regime non disdegna periodiche repressioni del dissenso e tende a scansare riforme troppo audaci, ma ha largamente aperto al mercato e all’iniziativa privata, al turismo e agli investimenti stranieri e, in politica estera, fa della pace e dell’amicizia con tutti, o quasi, una propria bandiera.

Anche nel cuore della vecchia Indocina francese si registra però un infausto cinquantenario. L’11 agosto 1961, infatti, l’aviazione americana cominciò ad inondare le campagne del Vietnam meridionale con l’agente Orange, un composto tossico destinato a sfoltire le foreste in cui si muovevano a loro agio i guerriglieri vietcong, tenendo in scacco anche i marines meglio addestrati, e a distruggere i raccolti che alimentavano combattenti e popolazione civile. L’Orange contiene diossina, di una varietà una cui dose di soli 80 grammi, dispersa nell’acqua potabile, basterebbe a rendere disabitata New York. Secondo dati del Pentagono, su di un’area di 2,6 milioni di ettari, pari ad un decimo del territorio sud-vietnamita, sono stati riversati a più riprese, tra il 1961 e il 1971, 170 chili di diossina; addirittura 400, invece, secondo un gruppo di ricercatori privati sempre americani.

Vittime potenziali dell’operazione (inutile, come si è visto, ai fini militari perseguiti) sono stati 4,8 milioni di abitanti di 20 mila villaggi. Di fatto, sarebbero state colpite direttamente o indirettamente, secondo la Croce rossa vietnamita, almeno un milione di persone, tra decessi, patologie di elevata gravità e malformazioni alla nascita (handicap fisici e mentali, carenza o eccesso di organi, lesioni irreversibili al sistema nervoso, ecc.). Il tutto protratto nel tempo e tuttora in corso, in quanto la diossina in questione, sostanza a lentissima degradazione, una volta inquinato l’ambiente fino ad integrarsi nella catena alimentare e a penetrare nel latte materno, continua a produrre i suoi effetti per decenni. Ammontano a circa 150 mila, oggi, i bambini e adolescenti vietnamiti gravemente menomati che sopravvivono grazie ad una costosa assistenza; e la cifra non sembra destinata a calare.

Non è il caso di parlare di genocidio? Se la parola può suonare grossa, negli ultimi tempi è stata spesa, sempre più spesso, anche per misfatti di dimensioni assai minori e di molto minore durata. Che si tratti quanto meno di crimine contro l’umanità, categoria cui gli esperti assegnano una gravità inferiore, pare difficile negare. Come tale, tuttavia, l’operazione Orange non è stata ancora classificata nelle sedi competenti a tutti i possibili effetti. Il governo americano non la smentisce e anzi fornisce dati già di per sé eloquenti benché forse riduttivi. La linea ufficiale di Washington, inalterata anche quando vittime di sostanze che dovrebbero essere bandite sono stati, secondo ogni apparenza, militari americani (nello stesso Vietnam come più di recente in Irak, Afghanistan ed ex-Jugoslavia), è però che il rapporto di causa ed effetto tra il contatto con diossina o uranio impoverito o altro ancora e certi decessi o danni fisici e mentali non sia sufficientemente provato.

Neppure da Obama, verosimilmente, ci si potrà aspettare almeno la presentazione di scuse ancorché tardive. Può invece sorprendere, piuttosto, che un gesto del genere non sia stato preteso da parte vietnamita, né al tempo dei negoziati di pace con Nixon e Kissinger né in questi ultimi anni, che hanno visto uno straordinario sviluppo dei rapporti tra i due paesi in tutti i campi; si è parlato persino di idillio e luna di miele. Sta di fatto che dopo la normalizzazione diplomatica proclamata da Bill Clinton nel 1995 Hanoi ha calorosamente accolto anche il suo successore Bush alla fine del 2006 e adesso i due ex nemici hanno effettuato manovre militari congiunte. Gli Stati Uniti sono al primo posto nelle esportazioni vietnamite (con oltre un quinto del totale) e negli investimenti diretti, e un recente accordo prevede che collaborino alla costruzione di 13 centrali nucleari.

Nel 2009 il Vietnam è stato visitato da 400 mila americani, compresi moltissimi veterani non privi di nostalgia, in un clima di amicizia turbato a tratti da qualche screzio in materia di diritti umani. Non però, a quanto sembra, dai tentativi sinora vani di un associazione di famiglie vietnamite di ottenere indennizzi per i guasti provocati dall’”erba americana” chiamando in causa una trentina di aziende USA produttrici dei relativi veleni con in testa due colossi come Monsanto e Dow Chemical. Queste hanno declinato ogni responsabilità sostenendo che per loro l’Orange era soltanto un defogliante, e due successive sentenze di tribunali americani hanno respinto la citazione in giudizio.

Il governo di Hanoi, per quanto si sappia, si è tenuto al di fuori della questione non meno di quello di Washington, dando l’impressione di voler mettere una pietra sul passato in nome di preminenti interessi economico-finanziari e, probabilmente ancor più, strategici. Il Vietnam, infatti, risente sempre più la crescente potenza di una Cina già minacciosa e aggressiva quando la comunanza politico-ideologica era molto più marcata e rilevante di adesso, tanto più che non mancano contese territoriali tra i due paesi. Con Pechino Hanoi si sforza di mantenere rapporti amichevoli, ma ad ogni buon conto si cautela coltivando alacremente anche quelli con l’altra grande vicina, l’India, oltre agli Stati Uniti.

Tutto normale, se vogliamo, e ben comprensibile. E’ altrettanto chiaro, però, che in un’era come l’attuale, ormai costellata da pesanti interventi armati in ogni parte del globo ufficialmente giustificati da finalità umanitarie, diventa inconcepibile passare sotto silenzio, e così in qualche modo legittimare, operazioni qualificabili come crimini contro l’umanità, da chiunque commessi, quanto meno allo scopo di scongiurarne il ripetersi in futuro.

Può darsi che un ulteriore indebolimento della cosiddetta superpotenza americana favorisca qualche soluzione del caso specifico di Orange. Oppure, che l’indebolimento complessivo dell’Occidente, principale se non esclusivo paladino di vere o presunte cause umanitarie, risolva il problema in generale nel senso di spazzare via solo ogni ipocrisia. Ci si deve invece augurare qualcosa di più e di meglio: che la comunità internazionale cresca davvero in quanto tale e riesca ad organizzarsi per perseguire in modo sistematico finalità indiscutibilmente nobili in linea di principio senza discriminazioni e senza guardare in faccia a nessuno. Sarà un’utopia, ma l’unica alternativa è quella minimalista della legge della giungla.

F.S.

IL PENTAGONO CANNIBALIZZA LA SPESA USA. CHE MALE C’E?

Niall Ferguson, un opinionista appassionato fautore della supremazia americana, ha inteso cartografare l’orrore del ‘New Isolationalism’: ha elencato gli aspiranti repubblicani alla Casa Bianca che vorrebbero tirare i remi in barca, che cioè condividono il sentimento sempre più diffuso, Bring the Troops Home. Per Ferguson, scandalizzato, “the consensus on this point verges on the supernatural”.

Ecco il catalogo dei traditori. Primo il front-runner del GOP Mitt Romney, cui Ferguson non perdona quello che chiama il lapsus freudiano di avere una volta auspicato di consegnare l’Afghanistan ‘ai talebani’, invece che agli afghani. Viene poi l’aspirante Ron Paul, reo secondo Ferguson di volere anche il ritiro dall’Irak, di avere rifiutato un intervento americano in Libia, di chiedere la fine dei bombardamenti su Yemen e Pakistan. Pure la candidata Michele Bachmann, regina del Tea Party, secondo Ferguson bestemmia: ‘In Libia non siamo stati né attaccati, né minacciati’.  Anche Newt Gingrich, già Speaker della Camera dei Rappresentanti, attenta alla gloria dell’America: “Ai nostri generali ordinerei il ritiro al più presto possibile”.

Solo gli aspiranti Tim Pawlenty e Rick Santorum hanno dato segni di ricordare ‘che siamo in Afghanistan perché lì Al Qaeda organizzò il colpo dell’11 Settembre. Ma nemmeno essi si oppongono con decisione al punto di vista dei più: L’America deve ritirare le truppe perché, nelle parole di Ron Paul, <risparmierebbe centinaia di miliardi di dollari>. Persino lo speranzoso ultimo arrivato, Jon Huntsman, si è associato alla posizione di Ron Paul.

“Welcome to the brave new world of isolationism, the theory -deplora Ferguson- that strategic calculation takes second place to nasty fiscal arithmetic”. Non ci sono limiti all’arrendevolezza di fronte alla Nasty Arithmetic: “L’ex segretario di Stato James Baker prevede che in meno di dieci anni gli interessi sul debito federale potrebbero superare le spese militari”: un sacrilegio. “Si è persino calcolato in sede ufficiale che, riducendo nel 2015 le truppe di pronto impiego a soli 45 mila uomini e donne, si risparmierebbero oltre 400 miliardi di dollari in cinque anni”. Altro orrore.

Ad ogni modo “è falso che le guerre di Bush siano la causa principale del dissesto finanziario in atto. Nel 2010 il bilancio della Difesa fu pari al 4,7% del Pil”. Ma, esclama trionfante Ferguson, “la Social Security più Medicare più Medicaid volle il 10,3%”. Che infamia: l’intera spesa sociale di una nazione di 300 e più milioni esige il doppio abbondante del Pentagono! Sentenzia, duro, Ferguson: “Non è la spesa militare che sta portando l’America  alla bancarotta. Sono le pensioni e gli altri costi del boom demografico”.

Per il Nostro, il responsabile-in-chief è Obama: entro l’estate prossima, 30 mila guerrieri in meno nell’Afghanistan. “The surge is over. This is not a declaration of victory. It is a declaration of bankrupcy”. Peggio ancora: “un alto esponente dell’Amministrazione ha ammesso che spendere tanto in Irak e Afghanistan <cannibalizza troppo la spesa pubblica>”. Mai quelli come Ferguson avrebbero immaginato una fine così dolorosa del regno degli USA sull’orbe terracqueo.

Tutti sanno che l’economia americana non regge più allo sforzo del bilancio bellico più gigantesco della storia. Quelli come Ferguson hanno scoperto di chi è la colpa: ‘the baby boomers who retire’.

Anthony Cobeinsey

IL PIU’ MOMENTANEO DEGLI IMPERI

Intervistato il giorno stesso che gli Stati Uniti hanno perso l’insegna ammiraglia dell’economia planetaria, lo storico Paul Kennedy, ‘studioso della fine delle potenze mondiali’, e così una specie di Gibbon del nostro tempo, ha espresso un certo ottimismo: “L’America si ridimensionerà. Si ritirerà dall’Irak e dall’Afghanistan, non manderà più eserciti smisurati in Medio Oriente e in Asia. Manterrà i suoi impegni con la Nato e il Giappone, ma non aprirà nuovi fronti come la Libia (…) La crisi attuale conferma il declino degli USA. I loro capi dovranno gestirlo con intelligenza, in modo da renderlo il più graduale e tollerabile possibile (…) La durata degli imperi,  anche di quelli ‘benevoli’ come si dice dell’America, si riduce sempre più. L’Olanda e l’Inghilterra tramontarono dopo avere eclissato la Spagna, ma seppero evitare sia un collasso improvviso, sia un declino graduale ma catastrofico. La decadenza delle grandi potenze può durare secoli, se gestita bene:  l’impero degli Asburgo cominciò a declinare 300 anni prima della sua scomparsa”.

Nell’assieme il ragionamento è giusto. Però lo storico di Yale avrebbe fatto meglio a lasciar perdere l’esperienza degli Asburgo. L’Austria degli Asburgo era amata da molti, ammirata o rispettata da quasi tutti, nemici compresi. Saggezza diplomatica e amministrativa, moderazione, equilibrio e il senso che noblesse oblige erano caratteri precipui della sua azione internazionale: Non sono pochi coloro che nei paesi già soggetti rimpiangono (o affettano di rimpiangere, che è lo stesso) i tempi in cui Austria felix regnava. Vienna non aveva bisogno di muovere guerre incessanti, non di sterminare i civili nel nome di un delittuoso diritto di provocare collateral damages. L’America del passato lontano fu, a ragione o a torto, la fidanzata del mondo. Quella di oggi è la nemica del mondo, una nazione canagliesca.

Cominciò Franklin Delano Roosevelt a mentire in grande quando affermò che a Pearl Harbor il Giappone aveva attaccato a tradimento, laddove per tutto il 1941 egli FDR aveva fatto l’impossibile per provocare l’attacco nipponico, e così trascinare in guerra l’America isolazionista. Uno dei suoi successori, John F. Kennedy, riprese in Indocina il bellicismo rooseveltiano, giustificato (nel 1961 come nel 1941) come impresa di liberazione. Gli ultimi presidenti, dai due Bush (in modo diseguale) a Obama hanno portato avanti la logica di un espansionismo wilsoniano-rooseveltiano così esasperato da suscitare, in aggiunta all’odio e alla disistima del mondo, il parossismo dell’indebitamento USA.

Se la contrapposizione a GW Bush, se cioè il meglio di una presa di coscienza americana, è rappresentata dal Barack Obama signore dei ‘drones’, grottescamente insignito del Nobel per la pace da stralunati o rimbambiti soloni scandinavi, allora è certo che gli Stati Uniti, se mai un po’ si ravvederanno, lo faranno perché schiacciati dal debito, non per una scelta di saggezza. Di tale scelta non saranno capaci. Con tutte le vanterie circa le loro grandi università,  grandi think tanks,  grandi centrali di intelligenza e di intelligence, gli USA è come fossero caduti in una sorta  di demenza pseudo- o tardo-imperiale.

Per essere impero occorre essere all’altezza. Gli Stati Uniti non hanno compiuto opere grandi fuori dei loro confini. Hanno vinto guerre quando la loro capacità di ‘overkill’ era smisurata. Nell’Afghanistan non è smisurata (anche per scarsità di fondi), dunque non vincono. Lo storico Paul Kennedy si dichiara d’accordo con Charles Kupchan, l’autore de La fine dell’era americana, il quale sostiene che il declino dell’Occidente è anche culturale. Di suo, Kennedy aggiunge: “Non molti anni fa si pensava che il mondo intero avrebbe accettato i valori occidentali. Non è stato così. Ci sono popoli che sembrano preferire regimi autoritari, o che interpretano la democrazia in modo diverso dal nostro”.

E, diciamo noi, fanno bene a non curarsi del nostro modo. Se la democrazia è ciò che abbiamo (=cleptocrazia, partitocrazia, sopraffazione del denaro, impostura permanente, pensiero unico impostato attorno al consumismo), ottima cosa è fare diversamente da noi. E ancora più sfrontata risulta la tesi -che in pochi dissennati è onesta convinzione- che le guerre degli USA e dei loro ausiliari ed ascari vengano intraprese per esportare democrazia e libertà.

Il bellicismo statunitense cominciò nel 1846, fingendo che nel West il Messico malmenasse gli allevatori e i pionieri americani, Ne risultarono l’annessione di California e New Mexico e il vasto allargamento del Texas. Cinquantadue anni dopo, guerra alla Spagna colpevole di non dare l’indipendenza ai creoli cubani (filoamericani). Risultato, acquisto di Cuba, Puerto Rico e  Filippine, in simultanea coll’impossessamento delle Hawaii e di Samoa. Solita motivazione: la monarchia indigena non si comportava bene. Dopo frequenti spedizioni dei Marines nei conflitti intestini del Messico e dell’intero bacino dei Caribi, nel 1917 il virtuoso presidente Woodrow Wilson riuscì a realizzare l’intervento nella Grande Guerra, atto fondante dell’impero mondiale USA. Finito il conflitto l’isolazionismo che il padre della patria George Washington aveva predicato si mise di traverso: il paese non condivise il progetto di ordine mondiale congegnato da Wilson. Ci vollero la miseria della Depressione, il semifallimento del New Deal e il mendacio del Grande Guerrafondaio (FDRoosevelt) per rendere possibile la partecipazione al secondo conflitto mondiale e il trionfo imperiale del 1945.

Molto meno fortunati furono quei presidenti che più ambirono ad emulare con la strapotenza delle armi il Volpone della Carta Atlantica e di Pearl Harbor: da JFKennedy a GWBush a Barack Obama. A quest’ultimo, il più maldestro dei Diadochi di Franklin Delano, è toccato di regnare ultimo della serie della grandezza: una specie di Romolo Augustolo deposto da Odoacre. Gli imperi di un tempo duravano millenni. Un magro settantennio dopo le fandonie della Carta Atlantica, l’Impero americano porta i libri al tribunale della storia.

A.M.Calderazzi

IRRIDERE O NO LE BUSINESS SCHOOLS?

Appreso che il governo di Pechino si propone di aprire presto 40 nuove business   Appreso che il governo di Pechino si propone di aprire presto 40 nuove business schools, Bob Lutz, un guru che è stato anche vicepresident della General Motors, avrebbe esclamato “Sono anni che non sentivo una notizia così buona”. Buona per l’industria americana of course, sempre più assillata dall’ingigantirsi della concorrenza cinese, Questo perché, come Lutz ha scritto in un libro recente, “per far ripartire l’economia americana dobbiamo licenziare gli MBA e rimettere al comando gli ingegneri”. Secondo lui, il terribile concorrente cinese commette un errore che gli costerà.

Che hanno fatto di male i Master in Business Administration? Per Lutz hanno preso il potere per finanziarizzare la governance. Invece di produrre e vendere meglio, hanno abbellito i bilanci con i risultati a breve e con la strategia delle operazioni di borsa. E’ stato osservato, infatti, che l’auge delle business schools ha coinciso col declino dell’industria americana. Forse l’auge non ci sarebbe stato se la cultura del management non avesse plagiato coi suoi precetti sia gli operatori economici, sia la gente in generale. Appena arrivato a poter pagare i costi delle grandi università, americane e non, il borghese di tutto il mondo ha mandato figli e figlie alle scuole di management e di consulting, i cui diplomi sarebbero stati passaporti per il successo. La realtà ha smentito le vanterie dei matematici d’affari, assurti alla fama soprattutto per i servizi prestati al congegno militare degli USA.

Il più importante tra coloro che sottrassero le manifatture agli ingegneri e ai commerciali, per consegnarle ai ‘whiz kids’ delle grandi scuole, Robert McNamara fu anche uno dei maggiori responsabili delle sconfitte e del disonore dell’America in Indocina: nonostante le forze armate statunitensi siano quelle che nella storia si sono fidate di più dei teorici accademici dell’efficienza. Mai  un apparato militare e industriale sarà più vertebrato di teorie specialistiche e di modelli di quanto lo sia stato quello americano nell’ultimo mezzo secolo.

I risultati li conosciamo: in guerra solo umiliazioni, in pace soprattutto arretramenti. Per questo, come segnalavamo nell’incipit, la sola speranza è che anche la Cartagine cinese, massimo tra gli avversari economici degli Stati Uniti, si affidi più del giusto ai saccenti giovanotti usciti dalle business schools.

schools, Bob Lutz, un guru che è stato anche vicepresident della General Motors, avrebbe esclamato “Sono anni che non sentivo una notizia così buona”. Buona per l’industria americana of course, sempre più assillata dall’ingigantirsi della concorrenza cinese, Questo perché, come Lutz ha scritto in un libro recente, “per far ripartire l’economia americana dobbiamo licenziare gli MBA e rimettere al comando gli ingegneri”. Secondo lui, il terribile concorrente cinese commette un errore che gli costerà.

Che hanno fatto di male i Master in Business Administration? Per Lutz hanno preso il potere per finanziarizzare la governance. Invece di produrre e vendere meglio, hanno abbellito i bilanci con i risultati a breve e con la strategia delle operazioni di borsa. E’ stato osservato, infatti, che l’auge delle business schools ha coinciso col declino dell’industria americana. Forse l’auge non ci sarebbe stato se la cultura del management non avesse plagiato coi suoi precetti sia gli operatori economici, sia la gente in generale. Appena arrivato a poter pagare i costi delle grandi università, americane e non, il borghese di tutto il mondo ha mandato figli e figlie alle scuole di management e di consulting, i cui diplomi sarebbero stati passaporti per il successo. La realtà ha smentito le vanterie dei matematici d’affari, assurti alla fama soprattutto per i servizi prestati al congegno militare degli USA.

Il più importante tra coloro che sottrassero le manifatture agli ingegneri e ai commerciali, per consegnarle ai ‘whiz kids’ delle grandi scuole, Robert McNamara fu anche uno dei maggiori responsabili delle sconfitte e del disonore dell’America in Indocina: nonostante le forze armate statunitensi siano quelle che nella storia si sono fidate di più dei teorici accademici dell’efficienza. Mai  un apparato militare e industriale sarà più vertebrato di teorie specialistiche e di modelli di quanto lo sia stato quello americano nell’ultimo mezzo secolo.

I risultati li conosciamo: in guerra solo umiliazioni, in pace soprattutto arretramenti. Per questo, come segnalavamo nell’incipit, la sola speranza è che anche la Cartagine cinese, massimo tra gli avversari economici degli Stati Uniti, si affidi più del giusto ai saccenti giovanotti usciti dalle business schools.

schools, Bob Lutz, un guru che è stato anche vicepresident della General Motors, avrebbe esclamato “Sono anni che non sentivo una notizia così buona”. Buona per l’industria americana of course, sempre più assillata dall’ingigantirsi della concorrenza cinese, Questo perché, come Lutz ha scritto in un libro recente, “per far ripartire l’economia americana dobbiamo licenziare gli MBA e rimettere al comando gli ingegneri”. Secondo lui, il terribile concorrente cinese commette un errore che gli costerà.

Che hanno fatto di male i Master in Business Administration? Per Lutz hanno preso il potere per finanziarizzare la governance. Invece di produrre e vendere meglio, hanno abbellito i bilanci con i risultati a breve e con la strategia delle operazioni di borsa. E’ stato osservato, infatti, che l’auge delle business schools ha coinciso col declino dell’industria americana. Forse l’auge non ci sarebbe stato se la cultura del management non avesse plagiato coi suoi precetti sia gli operatori economici, sia la gente in generale. Appena arrivato a poter pagare i costi delle grandi università, americane e non, il borghese di tutto il mondo ha mandato figli e figlie alle scuole di management e di consulting, i cui diplomi sarebbero stati passaporti per il successo. La realtà ha smentito le vanterie dei matematici d’affari, assurti alla fama soprattutto per i servizi prestati al congegno militare degli USA.

Il più importante tra coloro che sottrassero le manifatture agli ingegneri e ai commerciali, per consegnarle ai ‘whiz kids’ delle grandi scuole, Robert McNamara fu anche uno dei maggiori responsabili delle sconfitte e del disonore dell’America in Indocina: nonostante le forze armate statunitensi siano quelle che nella storia si sono fidate di più dei teorici accademici dell’efficienza. Mai  un apparato militare e industriale sarà più vertebrato di teorie specialistiche e di modelli di quanto lo sia stato quello americano nell’ultimo mezzo secolo.

I risultati li conosciamo: in guerra solo umiliazioni, in pace soprattutto arretramenti. Per questo, come segnalavamo nell’incipit, la sola speranza è che anche la Cartagine cinese, massimo tra gli avversari economici degli Stati Uniti, si affidi più del giusto ai saccenti giovanotti usciti dalle business schools.

JJJ

MILITARISM MAKES AMERICA THE NUT OF THE WORLD

TIME’s powerful indictment

It’s my moral duty to call your attention on a press event which is far more important, say, than  the historical one which uncovered the Watergate scandal. Watergate was small fry and venial sin if compared with the horrific reality of the U.S. war spending. On April 25 past TIME carried “How to save $1 trillion”, a thundering prosecuting speech by Mark Thompson against the senselessness of the American defense overspending.

The facts, figures and ideas of TIME will convince many readers that America has gone awry. That it has become the nut or crank of the world. That it has to do something really bold, lest the obsession for weapons and (illusory) planetary egemony forces its taxpayers to pay vigintillions for arms and professional warriors -from the Table of Numbers I learned that one vigintillion is a figure made by 1 followed by 63 zeros. At $700 billions per year the U.S. is already spending as much on his military as the rest of the world combined. It’s on the road to vigintillions.

The simplest and most honest way of informing you on the TIME reckoning is simply to transcribe some of its findings and concepts.

The U.S. Navy operates an 11-aircraft carrier fleet- each vessel costing $15 billions and being likely to be sunk by missiles in a real conflict with China. The Chinese capability will be such that the American carriers will have to stay so far away from China that the short-range aircraft they bear will be useless. A number of months ago a “Daily Babel” article pointed out that Secretary of Defense Robert Gates was struggling with admirals who defended the carriers, arguing (Gates) that the carriers are too big targets and will be prone to be destroyed by missiles. TIME reported that Gates “warned last year on the growing antiship capabilities of our adversaries before asking the unaskable question <Do we really need 11 carrier strike groups for another 30 years?>. Needless to say, each carrier requires the protection of several destroyers and submarines. “It’s just tradition, the industrial base and some other old and musty arguments that keep the shipyards building them” TIME comments.

Other unaskable questions. “Can the U.S. really afford more that 500 bases at home and around the world? Do the Air Force, Navy and Marines really need $400 billions in new jet fighters when their present fleets give them vast air superiority for years to come? Does the Navy really need 50 attack submarines when America’s main enemy hides in caves?”

Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has admonished that “the single biggest threat to our national security is our debt”. TIME calls it “an almost tragic irony the fact that we are borrowing cash from China to pay for weapons (…) If the Chinese want to slay us, they don’t even need to attack us with their missiles. They just have to call in their loans”. “We’ve waged war non stop for nearly a decade in Afghanistan, at a cost of nearly half a trillion dollars, against a foe with no army, no navy, no air force. We send $1 billion destroyers to handle five Somali pirates in a fiberglass skiff (…) As long as the U.S. is overspending on its defense, it lets its allies skimp on theirs and instead pour the savings into infrastructure, education and health care. Our tax dollars are paying for a military that is subsidizing the health care of our European allies”.

The personnel costs (pay, benefits et cet:) are exorbitant. ”Recently 60 members of the crew of the carrier Abraham Lincoln pocketed $57,000 each, tax free, simply to re-enlist. Pentagon medical costs have soared from $19 billions in 2001 to more than $50 billions. Secretary Gates has proposed cutting 102 on 952 generals and admirals. A recent New York Times/CBS poll found that citizens (55%) were willing to cut defense. Yet Congress continues to resist even minor reductions. One carrier generates 6,000 jobs and $400 millions in annual local spending. With numbers like that, who needs pork?

Aircraft carriers become harder to kill as more states of the Union invest in their future. “It’s a disease that infects the entire defense budget” says Gordon Adams, who oversaw Pentagon spending during the Clinton Administration. 

My comment: the laws of electoralism and pork make it impossible that elected politicians will ever trim wrong expenses producing jobs, business, votes and careers.

The American folly according to TIME is the insane mentality that Howard McKeon (R), the Representative who chairs the Armed Services Committee, enunciated like this: “A defense budget in decline portends an America in decline”. “Attitudes like that can bankrupt a nation and the public senses it” (TIME).

The weapons obsession began as a love affair of the Americans with the cavalry regiments which subjugated Indians in the West and easily defeated Mexicans. Today it has condemned the U.S.“to be at war for a startling two out of every three years since 1989, and there is no end in sight” (the remark was made by Univ.of Chicago professor John Mearsheimer).

“The Nemesis of American happiness” was the heading of an old column of mine in The Daily Babel. Planetary (tentative) hegemony itself is such frightful Goddess of retribution. 

It’s my moral duty to call your attention on a press event which is far more important, say, than  the historical one which uncovered the Watergate scandal. Watergate was small fry and venial sin if compared with the horrific reality of the U.S. war spending. On April 25 past TIME carried “How to save $1 trillion”, a thundering prosecuting speech by Mark Thompson against the senselessness of the American defense overspending.

The facts, figures and ideas of TIME will convince many readers that America has gone awry. That it has become the nut or crank of the world. That it has to do something really bold, lest the obsession for weapons and (illusory) planetary egemony forces its taxpayers to pay vigintillions for arms and professional warriors -from the Table of Numbers I learned that one vigintillion is a figure made by 1 followed by 63 zeros. At $700 billions per year the U.S. is already spending as much on his military as the rest of the world combined. It’s on the road to vigintillions.

The simplest and most honest way of informing you on the TIME reckoning is simply to transcribe some of its findings and concepts.

The U.S. Navy operates an 11-aircraft carrier fleet- each vessel costing $15 billions and being likely to be sunk by missiles in a real conflict with China. The Chinese capability will be such that the American carriers will have to stay so far away from China that the short-range aircraft they bear will be useless. A number of months ago a “Daily Babel” article pointed out that Secretary of Defense Robert Gates was struggling with admirals who defended the carriers, arguing (Gates) that the carriers are too big targets and will be prone to be destroyed by missiles. TIME reported that Gates “warned last year on the growing antiship capabilities of our adversaries before asking the unaskable question <Do we really need 11 carrier strike groups for another 30 years?>. Needless to say, each carrier requires the protection of several destroyers and submarines. “It’s just tradition, the industrial base and some other old and musty arguments that keep the shipyards building them” TIME comments.

 

Other unaskable questions. “Can the U.S. really afford more that 500 bases at home and around the world? Do the Air Force, Navy and Marines really need $400 billions in new jet fighters when their present fleets give them vast air superiority for years to come? Does the Navy really need 50 attack submarines when America’s main enemy hides in caves?”

 

Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has admonished that “the single biggest threat to our national security is our debt”. TIME calls it “an almost tragic irony the fact that we are borrowing cash from China to pay for weapons (…) If the Chinese want to slay us, they don’t even need to attack us with their missiles. They just have to call in their loans”. “We’ve waged war non stop for nearly a decade in Afghanistan, at a cost of nearly half a trillion dollars, against a foe with no army, no navy, no air force. We send $1 billion destroyers to handle five Somali pirates in a fiberglass skiff (…) As long as the U.S. is overspending on its defense, it lets its allies skimp on theirs and instead pour the savings into infrastructure, education and health care. Our tax dollars are paying for a military that is subsidizing the health care of our European allies”.

The personnel costs (pay, benefits et cet:) are exorbitant. ”Recently 60 members of the crew of the carrier Abraham Lincoln pocketed $57,000 each, tax free, simply to re-enlist. Pentagon medical costs have soared from $19 billions in 2001 to more than $50 billions. Secretary Gates has proposed cutting 102 on 952 generals and admirals. A recent New York Times/CBS poll found that citizens (55%) were willing to cut defense. Yet Congress continues to resist even minor reductions. One carrier generates 6,000 jobs and $400 millions in annual local spending. With numbers like that, who needs pork?

Aircraft carriers become harder to kill as more states of the Union invest in their future. “It’s a disease that infects the entire defense budget” says Gordon Adams, who oversaw Pentagon spending during the Clinton Administration. 

My comment: the laws of electoralism and pork make it impossible that elected politicians will ever trim wrong expenses producing jobs, business, votes and careers.

The American folly according to TIME is the insane mentality that Howard McKeon (R), the Representative who chairs the Armed Services Committee, enunciated like this: “A defense budget in decline portends an America in decline”. “Attitudes like that can bankrupt a nation and the public senses it” (TIME).

The weapons obsession began as a love affair of the Americans with the cavalry regiments which subjugated Indians in the West and easily defeated Mexicans. Today it has condemned the U.S.“to be at war for a startling two out of every three years since 1989, and there is no end in sight” (the remark was made by Univ.of Chicago professor John Mearsheimer).

“The Nemesis of American happiness” was the heading of an old column of mine in The Daily Babel. Planetary (tentative) hegemony itself is such frightful Goddess of retribution.

JJJ

NEW ACTORS ON THE AFGHAN SCENE

It seems that India is building the world’s biggest nuclear plant, in addition to its first nuclear submarine. No comment on the relevance of the latter program from the viewpoint of efforts to improve the lot of the Indian paupers, who did not disappear. However, the Indian economic might being now an established factor, it’s likely that the giant former possession of Britain will play a much larger role in the general area which includes the Indian Ocean on one hand, Afghanistan on the other.

In the latter country (which borders Pakistan rather than India) New Delhi has been a prudent player for a number of years. It is helping the Afghanis with programs such as road building and in less ambitious plans which are prevalently financed by the United States. Indian companies are involved in construction works for the new seat of the Afghan parliament. Of course such Indian activism arouses the resentment of the perennial rival, Pakistan.

American diplomatic sources believe that Islamabad will as a reply to India strengthen its ties with the Talibans and the Moslem militants in Kashmir. Recently Yusuf Raza Gilani, Pakistan’s prime minister, declared that New Delhi must reduce her role in Afghanistan and in the Pakistani province of Baluchistan if she wants to improve relations with Islamabad. The Indian involvement in the Afghan act may or may not grow larger; right now it’s not really heavy. One of the likely aims of New Delhi is contributing to  some improvement of the situation, as the country theoretically controlled by Kabul will be vital for getting natural gas from Central Asia.

While New Delhi seems currently reinforcing her ties with the United States, Pakistan is engaged in a rather bitter feud with Washington over the war missions of the American Predator (unmanned) drones on the tribal areas of Pakistan which border on Afghanistan. A recent report of the Pakistan’s Human Rights Commission states that in 2010 the drones  killed 957 civilians. A few days ago the head of Islamabad’s Intelligence met Leon Panetta, director of the American CIA, and allegedly stated that his government will restrict cooperation with the U.S. against terrorism if there will be no reduction in the drone attacks on Waziristan. As recently as April 13 one or more Predators killed six persons in South Waziristan. Of course the American drone attacks violate the sovereignty of Pakistan, in addition to killing human beings, many of whom are not involved in Taliban activities. The Islamabad minister of foreign affairs has strongly protested against the American war operations in Pakistan, which belie lofty professions.

On the other hand the American side does not conceal some resentment because of those Islamabad’s nuclear and defense programs which are supported by China. Such programs are said to include building two Chasma reactors in Pakistan and a joint JF17 attack plane. China too is supposed to be interested in a larger role in Afghanistan. A few days ago Yusuf Raza Gilani, Pakistan’s premier,  flew to Kabul on the invitation of president Karzai.

A.C.

LEZIONE DI TEDESCO PER GLI STATI UNITI

Ma c’è da imparare per tutti

Negli anni ’70 gli Stati Uniti e la Repubblica federale tedesca erano legati a filo doppio, dal comune timore dei missili sovietici e dall’esistenza di un’altra Germania, comunista e satellite dell’URSS. La posizione comunque subalterna della Germania occidentale non impediva però all’allora cancelliere Helmut Schmidt, socialdemocratico di sicura fede atlantica, di criticare vivacemente la politica economico-finanziaria del grande alleato e in particolare il mantenimento  di alti tassi di interesse per attirare negli USA, in fase critica sotto la presidenza Carter, capitali stranieri a multiforme scapito delle economie europee.

Sopravvennero poi il crollo del “campo socialista”, la riunificazione tedesca e la monopolizzazione americana del ruolo di superpotenza planetaria, per la verità esercitato spesso in modo da evidenziare piuttosto l’impotenza militare oltre che politica degli Stati Uniti, alle prese con un nuovo ordine o meglio disordine mondiale, in ultima analisi meno facilmente padroneggiabile di prima. Sue ulteriori modifiche, altrettanto epocali, sono derivate dall’ascesa di nuove potenze con in testa la Cina, dal profilarsi della minaccia probabilmente sopravvalutata ancorchè plateale dell’estremismo islamico e infine dall’esplosione della peggiore crisi economica-finanziaria del dopoguerra, soprattutto in Occidente e in ogni caso per gli stessi Stati Uniti.

Non sorprende perciò che i legami tedesco-americani si siano allentati facendo posto ad una dialettica non apertamente ostile da alcuna parte ma ugualmente spigolosa e foriera di un crescente allontanamento reciproco, benché la Germania stenti o forse persino esiti ad assumere la prevista guida dell’Unione europea o quanto meno dell’Eurozona. La sua vecchia “economia sociale di mercato” aveva comunque retto alla crisi meglio di tutte le altre (o almeno così sembrava) e ciò spiega sia il rafforzato prestigio del “modello renano”, contrapposto alle ricette anglosassoni degli ultimi decenni, sia l’inclinazione dei suoi gestori a lesinare ancor meno di prima le critiche a queste ultime e ai loro effetti.

Tra gli emuli di Schmidt si distingue oggi una sorta di suo erede, l’ex ministro delle Finanze nella “grande coalizione” berlinese Peer Steinbrueck, uscito personalmente con onore dal recente tracollo elettorale della SPD (che peraltro dà già qualche segno di riscossa) grazie ai meriti acquisiti, un po’ come Giulio Tremonti, nel tenere a bada la crisi e in particolare salvando numerose banche tedesche dall’insolvenza. Forse piccato da certi inviti americani, non solo di parte ultraliberista, agli europei a rivedere il loro “welfare state troppo generoso” (così Joe Klein su “Time” del 10/1/2011) e dalle sollecitazioni di Washington alla Germania a stimolare i consumi interni per aiutare le altre economie sofferenti, Steinbrueck ha replicato con una serie di bordate tali da colpire nel cuore posizioni e orientamenti d’oltre oceano.

Nella sua rubrica fissa sul settimanale “Die Zeit” l’ex ministro ha cominciato, in gennaio, col demolire il mantra americano, in auge dai tempi di Reagan, delle tasse da ridurre per principio contando su un loro preteso effetto di autofinanziamento: secondo lui, una pura chimera priva di basi scientifiche, smentita dalle esperienze concrete ed esiziale per un paese altamente indebitato come gli USA, anche a causa di un’applicazione discriminatoria a favore dei redditi più alti. Un esempio, insomma, che la Germania dovrebbe, a suo avviso, guardarsi bene dall’imitare come vorrebbero alcuni ambienti tedeschi invocanti imposte dirette più basse.

In marzo Steinbrueck ha poi rincarato la dose bollando come suicida l’insistenza americana a combattere l’indebitamento contraendo sempre nuovi debiti invece di sottoporsi ad una pur dolorosa terapia di disintossicazione da una simile droga, mettendo a repentaglio la propria affidabilità finanziaria e rischiando di aggravare la già “enorme dipendenza finanziaria dagli investitori stranieri e in particolare dalla Cina”, che “minaccia di tradursi prima o poi in dipendenza politica”. Miope sarebbe inoltre la Federal Riserve che continua a inondare il paese di liquidità per rianimare un’economia che avrebbe piuttosto bisogno di profonde modifiche strutturali a cominciare dal risollevamento dell’apparato industriale, deperito anche in rapporto al gonfiato settore finanziario, con conseguente perdita di competitività e squilibrio della bilancia commerciale.

Agli USA Steinbrueck raccomanda altresì, oltre che un aumentato anzichè ridotto prelievo fiscale, un’adeguata contrazione della spesa pubblica che, se fosse indispensabile estendere agli impegni sociali, dovrebbe incidere preliminarmente sulla voce armamenti e altre spese militari. E non esclude neppure che un duraturo risanamento possa richiedere drastiche revisioni dell’American way of life con tutti gli sprechi e i danni ambientali che essa comporta. Per non parlare, infine, degli ulteriori danni che il rinvio di terapie efficaci e l’immutato ricorso a rimedi fallaci, come la politica del denaro facile (che l’osservatore tedesco non esita ad affiancare ad un fattore perturbante quale gli attentati dell’11 settembre), arrecherebbero anche al resto del mondo, sotto forma di nuove bolle sui mercati delle materie prime, spinte inflazionistiche e svalutazioni competitive in campo monetario.

L’ex numero tre del primo governo Merkel non manca di tributare l’omaggio di rito a qualità che si attribuiscono agli americani in dose maggiore rispetto agli europei: fiducia in se stessi e capacità di battere nuove strade. A questo motivo quasi residuale di speranza affianca però un non celato pessimismo circa la probabilità che indicazioni come le sue vengano accolte e seguite sia nel breve periodo, dominato dallo scontro fra i partiti e dentro i partiti in vista delle prossime elezioni presidenziali, sia a più lungo termine, specie nell’eventualità tutt’altro che remota di una bocciatura di Obama e di una rivincita repubblicana sotto la prevalente spinta oltranzistica del Tea Party. Il fatto che nel frattempo l’apparente maggioranza del paese bocci ad ogni buon conto una riforma sanitaria sacrosanta ma già annacquata rispetto al progetto originario la dice lunga in proposito.

All’inizio di marzo, prima che Steinbrueck scrivesse quanto sopra, “Time” pubblicava un peana al nuovo miracolo economico di una Germania definita “Cina d’Europa” e “tigre del vecchio mondo”, illustrandone con chiarezza i vari aspetti. Alla domanda di che cosa il suo esempio possa insegnare agli USA rispondeva tuttavia evidenziando un solo punto: l’appoggio statale a quel complesso di imprese piccole o medio-piccole spesso di proprietà familiare che costituirebbero tuttora la spina dorsale dell’industria tedesca e alla cui vitalità, efficienza e immutata specializzazione nelle produzioni manifatturiere tradizionali piuttosto che nelle nuove tecnologie si dovrebbero l’attuale primato di competitività nel mondo sviluppato e il conseguente boom  delle esportazioni.

Un aspetto importante, senza dubbio, oltre che familiare ad orecchie italiane, ma che certo non esaurisce la materia di confronto tra due diversi modelli o meglio esperienze storiche e visioni d’insieme della problematica economica e non solo economica. Le rispettive esperienze, per la verità, sono poi diverse solo in parte, ricordando quella americana del New Deal rooseveltiano, il cui ripudio ideologico risalente agli anni di Reagan sembra tuttavia destinato a sopravvivere anche alla plateale dimostrazione recente che senza il massiccio intervento statale di salvataggio il sistema economico-finanziario USA, lasciato in balìa del liberismo e della deregulation più sfrenati con conseguenti degenerazioni, sarebbe oggi ridotto in macerie.

Stupirsi che sulla sponda repubblicana, quanto meno, si arrivi persino a sostenere che per i singoli Stati dell’Unione, oggi in gran parte a rischio di insolvenza, non vada esclusa una salutare bancarotta, non significa naturalmente auspicare che da questa e dall’altra parte dell’oceano si instauri o rinasca la moda dello Stato imprenditore a tutto campo o impiccione oltre misura. Significa invece, innanzitutto, che sembra doverosa, anzi vitale, la conservazione da parte dei pubblici poteri di una funzione normativa e di controllo adeguata, ossia semmai rafforzata, per prevenire e reprimere pratiche e comportamenti irresponsabili, al limite criminosi e comunque rovinosi per tutti come quelli cui si è assistito o, meglio, che sono stati improvvisamente rivelati negli ultimi anni anche a chi avrebbe dovuto saperne ex officio.

A questo riguardo, sfortunatamente, non si direbbe che il consenso necessario per un’azione risoluta da parte degli Stati, a livello individuale e collettivo, sia facilmente ottenibile. Gli interessi di categoria con relative connivenze si fanno verosimilmente sentire non meno dei pregiudizi ideologici. Desta qualche sospetto anche il fatto che Steinbrueck non tocchi questo argomento nelle sue critiche e sollecitazioni agli Stati Uniti, mentre sta emergendo che le banche tedesche sono state sì meno spensierate di quelle americane nel gestire i propri affari ma avrebbero potuto mostrarsi ancor più avvedute anche dopo l’esplosione della crisi e dovrebbero perciò astenersi oggi dal premere sul governo di Berlino per una difesa ad oltranza dei loro interessi a spese dei soci dell’Eurozona messi in ginocchio dalla crisi stessa.

C’è chi dei micidiali effetti della finanza allegra è più responsabile di altri, e farebbe bene a riconoscerlo apertamente, a pentirsi e a trarne le debite conseguenze. Ma tocca a tutti fare la propria parte a quest’ultimo riguardo per evitare che eventuali ricadute (peraltro già denunciate qua e là) nei peggiori vizi e tentazioni provochino nuovi cataclismi tali da annullare qualsiasi beneficio derivante dalla diffusione di un modello pur rivelatosi per il resto preferibile ad un altro.  

Licio Serafini

UNITING: America’s true claim to glory

President Obama‘s latest Message on the state of the Union has been one more occasion for some admiring commentators abroad to extoll the virtues of the US political process, when compared for instance with the Italian (unruly and fractious) one. One of said commentators, Massimo Teodori, a professor of American history, specified that he was moved by the televised standing ovation given to the President (during the speech on the State of the Union) in the national Capitol – both Democratic and Republican members of Congress clapping their hands in a spirit of patriotism and unity.

The professor’s sensitivity should better be offered to more significant aspects of the American experience. The short show of bipartisanship in ceremonial occurrences such as a customary oration of the President does not deserve so much praise. The attitudes of the US Congress have never been that admirable. In fact the Capitol is the high temple of the often unethical management of public affairs. In America too most occupations are more respected than the career of professional politicians, top legislators included.

Well more relevant the professor’s sentimentality would be, had he recalled the facts of the American colonies confederating and so creating history’s foremost nation. If compared with the nastiness of the Fathers and Uncles of the so-called European Union, the American colonial leaders make figure of true Moses. American colonies started confederating more than three and half centuries ago. As early as 1643 Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Haven and Plymouth created “a firm and perpetual league” among themselves. That was really great. Possibly at that time the American context and spirit made better citizens. In colonial times a portion of the subjected class was made by white ‘bond servants’, in addition to black slaves. Several of said bond servants where convicts who had been transported from England. In due time even convicts could become good citizens: one of them became attorney-general of Virginia.

The next step of the American unification was of course the proliferation of Committees of Correspondence, beginning with the one which Samuel Adams organized in 1772. Two years later the Virginia Burgesses (meeting at a tavern- their House had been dissolved by the British rulers) deliberated the First Continental Congress, to be convened annually. Indeed such Congress met in Philadelphia on September 5, 1774. Another two years elapsed, then the Declaration of Independence was adopted. In four short years a great nation was born.

How inferior, even despicable, the behavior of the so called builders of Europe. Fiftyfive years after the Treaty of Rome (1956) the progress of political unification of the Old Continent is next to nothing. Being supposed to be the heirs of the world’s greatest historical patrimony (didn’t Europe rule the planet?) said ‘builders’ deserve the utmost scorn. Today some thirty countries, some of them really diminutive ones) are comically sticking to their sovereign independence, at a time when global trends are conquering the world. Who knows, maybe the next 55 years might advance the process of confederation that in the British colonies of North America only took 55 months.

This is the true greatness of the United States, before becoming obese and viciously addicted to weapons. Compared to the prowess of the Burgesses of Virginia, the bipartisan applauding of Obama’s rethoric on conquering the future (America too is declining) is phony.

Needless to say, the chieflets of Europe exculpate themselves by invoking the difficulty of amalgamating dozens of languages and national traditions. But if said chieflets had been in the shoes of the members of the Committees of Correspondence, probably America had never unified.

Anthony Cobeinsy

Dalla miseria alla prosperità…e ritorno

Quando Mazzini fonda a Berna la “Giovine Europa” nel 1834 le sorti del mondo sono nelle mani delle potenze europee, eppure i popoli delle nazioni più potenti d’Europa sono caratterizzati dalla miseria più nera:

Dickens pubblica “Oliver Twist” nel 1837-38, Marx attinge a documenti ufficiali del Parlamento inglese e ai numerosi studi sul pauperismo per documentarla nel Libro Primo de “Il Capitale”. La sia pur parziale presa di coscienza di questa intollerabile miseria porta alla nascita dello stato sociale moderno nella Germania di Bismarck nel 1883-89. Le idee socialiste, il successo dei bolscevichi e la loro presa del potere in Russia spingono i governi socialdemocratici sulla stessa strada. Ma le condizioni di vita rimangono cattive in Europa (come testimonia George Orwell in “Down and Out in Paris and London = Senza un soldo a Parigi e a Londra” 1933 e in “Fiorirà l’aspidistra” 1936) e non sono affatto buone anche negli Stati Uniti, il paese idealizzato come il più ricco e felice del mondo, e peggiorano dopo la crisi del 1929 come mostra magistralmente Steinbeck in “The Grapes of Wrath = Furore” 1939.

Gli Stati Uniti, con una popolazione inferiore ai 4 milioni nel 1790, di 31 milioni di abitanti nel 1860 che diventano 91 nel 1910, totalmente dipendenti dall’Europa per scienza e tecnologia, sono dalla fine dell’Ottocento il maggior produttore agricolo e manifatturiero del mondo. Ma ciò non poteva sorprendere: la terra non costava nulla perché era stata sottratta agli abitanti originari sterminati o confinati nelle riserve, buona parte della manodopera era stata allevata nei paesi poveri dai quali proveniva e si era trasferita in America nel fiore degli anni. Le condizioni miserevoli di molti non faceva notizia, anche perché il governo era espressione del mondo degli affari e tendeva a porre l’accento sulle grandi possibilità offerte ai più intraprendenti e capaci indipendentemente dalla loro origine sociale.

Gli USA sono quindi un unicum per quanto riguarda le loro origini e la loro storia intrisa di ipocrisia (si predica il libero scambio e si pratica il protezionismo fin dagli albori, si fa la guerra civile 1861-65 per abolire la schiavitù ma non si fanno diventare cittadini gli ex-schiavi se non un secolo dopo) e di sopraffazione (ci si espande territorialmente sottraendo territori al Messico e si asserviscono agli interessi yankees le ex-colonie di Spagna e Portogallo). I loro stili di vita sono fondati su abitazioni di legno vaste ma precarie e poco durature, su una cucina che ha ben poche attrattive, sul bigottismo e il fondamentalismo religioso, sull’isolamento superabile in modo costoso con mezzi di trasporto soprattutto privati. Non dovrebbero quindi poter essere un modello per nessun paese, e soprattutto per i paesi europei, ma in qualche modo invece lo diventano.

Persino la diffusione di massa dell’automobile (dal 1909), mezzo utile per superare l’isolamento nel quale vivono le comunità urbane e rurali americane, spinge nel corso del Novecento alla motorizzazione privata nche i paesi europei densamente popolati e caratterizzati da città di origine antica inadatte a un pesante traffico automobilistico.

Per contrastare la miseria che caratterizza l’Europa nasce la previdenza sociale e il /welfare state/ farà sentire i suoi benefici dopo la seconda guerra mondiale. Ma negli S.U. non si sente il bisogno di queste misure: la domanda mondiale di qualsiasi prodotto cresce e gli USA sono pronti a fornirli.

Nel 1967 l’economista americano E. F. Denison pubblica “Why Growth Rates Differ. Postwar Experience in Nine Western Countries” nel quale analizza le ragioni che hanno portato i paesi europei considerati (si noti che l’Italia non è tra questi) ad avere dei tassi medi di crescita dell’economia superiori a quelli degli Stati Uniti. Denison parte dal presupposto che le condizioni di vita prevalenti negli SU del 1925 siano sostanzialmente le stesse, dal punto di vista del benessere materiale, di quelle del 1960 nei paesi europei più sviluppati ivi considerati: un divario di ben 35 anni che tuttavia verrà presto colmato. I livelli medi di benessere dell’Europa economicamente sviluppata (Italia compresa!) entro il 1990 sono infatti paragonabili, e per alcuni aspetti sono persino superiori, a quelli che caratterizzano l’America, come testimonia anche la prima edizione dello Human Development Report (UNDP 1991) che irrita non poco le autorità degli Stati Uniti.

Non bastano il maggior reddito spendibile e il più elevato consumo di energia a far ritenere che il benessere materiale sia maggiore negli SU. Là le automobili sono più grandi, più voraci di carburante, coprono mediamente distanze maggiori. Le abitazioni e gli uffici sono non soltanto riscaldati d’inverno, ma anche rinfrescati d’estate facendo uso di energia in ogni stagione. Le spese per l’abitazione (fatta di materiali poco duraturi) riguardano tutti nel corso della loro vita, mentre da noi è sufficiente che una generazione ne faccia l’acquisto per passarla poi a quelle successive che dovranno soltanto provvedere alle eventuali riparazioni. Le spese per l’istruzione dei figli, con il degrado che caratterizza la scuola pubblica americana di ogni ordine e grado, è divenuta una delle voci imprescindibili di ogni bilancio familiare. Questa tendenza comincia a verificarsi anche da noi, ma la tradizione di eccellenza della scuola pubblica italiana resiste ancora, e in misura maggiore di quanto i mezzi di disinformazione di massa non facciano credere. Ma intanto anche da noi, senza che lo giustifichino né condizioni climatiche né temperature, si seguono da tempo modelli costruttivi che implicano persino edifici con finestre che non si possono aprire, mentre nella maggior parte del territorio italiano potremmo godere dell’aria “incondizionata” fornita da madre Natura per quasi tutti i mesi dell’anno.

In America, come in Europa, le condizioni generali di vita dei meno abbienti sono andate peggiorando negli ultimi due decenni e la crisi finanziaria scatenata nel 2007 dall’avidità di gestori e risparmiatori soprattutto anglosassoni ha peggiorato la situazione colpendo tutti, e forse in maggior misura proprio chi non aveva alcuna responsabilità nel generarla.

Anche in America ci sarebbe quindi più che mai un gran bisogno di alcune istituzioni dello stato sociale. Ma da un lato le reali condizioni di vita prevalenti in Europa sono completamente ignote agli americani (che
non conoscono le lingue straniere, che non vanno all’estero e che quando viaggiano lo fanno in un modo che non favorisce la conoscenza della vita delle persone che abitano i luoghi visitati o che sono la destinazione di soggiorni anche prolungati come accade alla famiglie dei militari di stanza nelle basi o ai militari in missione nei teatri di guerra) per non parlare del fatto che l’Europa tende a disfarsi di queste istituzioni per assomigliare sempre di più all’America. Per esempio l’abolizione in Italia della cosiddetta “scala mobile” – attuata nel 1992 – ha privato il Paese di uno strumento che consentiva ai lavoratori di mantenere (quasi) inalterato il potere d’acquisto dei propri salari e alle imprese di godere di una domanda di beni e servizi costante.

Così stando le cose è impensabile che l’America voglia dotarsi di quelle istituzioni dello stato sociale di cui l’Europa è sul punto di disfarsi, senza una vera ragione se non quella di favorire il settore bancario-assicurativo che propone varie formule di risparmio gestito, ma che non potrà mai assicurare dei redditi sufficienti a mantenere uno standard di vita come quello derivante dal salario e, ancora oggi (ma fino a quando?), dalla successiva pensione maturata.

Gli Stati Uniti, stampando il dollaro americano, la moneta usata nelle quotazioni dei beni transati internazionalmente e quale strumento di riserva, possono permettersi di pagare i dipendenti pubblici e i materiali bellici e civili prodotti dalle imprese americane per alimentare le loro guerre in giro per il mondo e fare tutti (o quasi) felici senza costi per il contribuente americano il quale, spinto dal sistema a fare acquisti contando sul reddito futuro, si trova a mal partito quando questo reddito si rivela inadeguato o comunque al di sotto di quello atteso.

E veniamo a Mirafiori e ai superbonus …

La FIAT non cessa di deludere. Collusa con il potere politico fin dalla sua nascita, ha goduto di posizioni sostanzialmente monopolistiche che non ha utilizzato per innovare ma soltanto per incamerare i profitti a beneficio della proprietà. Divenuta – così si dice, ma la realtà è più complessa – un’impresa privata come le altre, dichiara di non poter produrre in Italia senza far scomparire ogni traccia di diritto per i lavoratori coinvolti: i costi connessi al lavoro sarebbero troppo alti.

Come mai allora, dovremmo chiederci, la produzione automobilistica continua in paesi ad alto reddito come Germania, Giappone e Stati Uniti?

La Germania continua ad essere il quarto produttore di autoveicoli del mondo: 5,2 milioni nel 2009 e 6,2 nel 2007. La sua produzione è diminuita in termini assoluti (anche perché la produzione mondiale è passata da 73 milioni di autoveicoli nel 2007 a 61,7 nel 2009) ma è rimasta quasi inalterata come percentuale della produzione mondiale (dall’8,49% all’8,43%), un dato importante che rivela stabilità ove si pensi che nello stesso arco temporale il Giappone è passato dal 15,88% al 12,86% e gli Stati Uniti dal 14,73% al 9,25%. Naturalmente questi dati risentono della presenza ormai esorbitante e travolgente della Cina che è passata dal 12,17% al 22,35% della produzione mondiale e della Corea del Sud, ormai quinto produttore mondiale passato dal 5,60% al 6,84%. Si noti che questi soli tre paesi dell’Estasia coprivano nel 2007 il 33,65% della produzione automobilistica mondiale divenuto il 42,05% nel 2009. In quel breve spazio temporale l’Italia è passata dal 14-esimo (1,284 milioni) al 18-esimo posto (843.239 auto). Eppure i nostri managers rivendicano il diritto ad essere pagati in un modo semplicemente scandaloso per l’entità degli emolumenti, per tacere dei risultati deludenti. Proprio come accade in America .…

Il direttore cinese della fabbrica di calze che mostra con orgoglio il suo impianto che dalla Cina esporta in 153 paesi e che è attrezzato con le più moderne macchine (comprate dalla fabbrica italiana che le produce in provincia di Brescia) dovrebbe farci riflettere sui luoghi comuni che circolano intorno alla delocalizzazione e all’importanza cruciale del costo del lavoro. In questa fabbrica, situata in Cina, il personale addetto alla produzione è ridotto al minimo, dato che si tratta di un processo produttivo che fa uso di macchine altamente automatizzate.

Se i cinesi fossero davvero molto più bravi di noi non comprerebbero i nostri macchinari ma se li fabbricherebbero da soli. Perché un imprenditore cinese ha successo facendo uso delle nostre macchine? Non per via del minor costo del lavoro che non può incidere sensibilmente in una produzione a intensità di capitale relativamente alta.

Il fatto che chi si occupa di finanza abbia un successo economico maggiore di chi produce beni e servizi, non incoraggia i veri imprenditori. Un vero imprenditore – e in Italia ce ne sono davvero tanti, che reggono sulle loro spalle il Paese – non pensa continuamente a dove andrà a localizzare i suoi impianti per ottenere un risparmio che potrà anche rivelarsi controproducente, ma cercherà di migliorare il suo prodotto per accrescere il numero dei suoi clienti e ottenere così la soddisfazione che i veri imprenditori hanno perseguito da sempre, per l’autostima e con la consapevolezza di essere grandi come membri della società.

L’elemento generazionale non va trascurato. I figli di molti imprenditori sono inadatti a esercitare il mestiere paterno, dato che imprenditori si nasce, o possono essere convinti dalle mode dominanti a seguire e non a precedere come fa l’imprenditore che vede più lontano e prima degli altri. Per esempio l’Ing. De Benedetti, esercitando l’ingegneria finanziaria, ha distrutto un’impresa unica al mondo come la Olivetti. Così alle prime difficoltà si chiude o si accettano offerte che finiscono per distruggere l’impresa. Le maestranze esperte vengono disperse e il sistema economico ne soffre.

Ciascuna di queste piccole cose ci spinge alla resa, la nostra visione del mondo non ci fa guardare al futuro con ottimismo. La fiducia dei giovani, senza prospettive di un lavoro stabile e che dia soddisfazioni, non ha appigli per sopravvivere. Ci si adagia, si leggono i giornali, si ascoltano i politici e la sensazione di trovarsi in un deserto di valori si fa certezza. Nessuno storico e nessun sociologo potrà mai spiegare quei fenomeni che hanno inizio come invisibili movimenti orogenetici che si rivelano alla lunga più sconvolgenti dei terremoti. Per capirci qualcosa bisogna leggere la grande letteratura e guardare i quadri dipinti dai grandi maestri …

Gli Stati Uniti ci hanno dato il parafulmine e l’alfabeto Morse, ma anche la macchina della verità e l’IQ insieme ai test per misurare l’intelligenza delle “razze” umane. Non dovremmo quindi prenderli troppo sul serio e prestar loro fede come modelli; men che meno imitare i loro vizi. Ma lo stiamo facendo e condividere nientemeno che con la grande America il declino non lo renderà meno duro per i nostri figli.

Gianni Fodella

THE RIGHT WING, SIN, AND THE DEMISE OF AMERICA

David Brooks, a NY Times columnist, Right-Wing ideologue, and irrepressible apologist for big corporations and America’s plutocratic 1%, in an opinion reflecting on the shooting tragedy in Tucson, Az., called Obama’s speech “wonderful”, in part because “He didn’t try to explain the rampage that occurred there.” (As an inflamer of intolerance, prejudice, and hatred, Brooks must have taken great solace in that.) Brooks then goes on to reflect (among other things) on “civility.” “Speeches about civility,” he writes, “will be taken to heart most by those people whose good character renders them unnecessary. Meanwhile, those who are inclined to intellectual thuggery and partisan one-sidedness will temporarily resolve to do better but then slip back to old habits the next time their pride feels threatened…Civility,” he goes on to say, “is a tree with deep roots,” which are “failure, sin, weakness, and ignorance.” (His thesis, by the way, which he then goes on to propound, is totally unconvincing, if not absurd.) He ends his opinion piece with a quote from the famous Protestant theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, in which Niebuhr reflects, “Therefore we are saved by the final form of love, which is forgiveness.”

What is amazing about Brooks’ fantastic piece of sophistry, equaling some of the sophistry that Socrates and Plato also had to deal with, is that Brooks is really criticizing those politicians and citizens who disagree with his extremist Right-Wing rhetoric (when he refers to “intellectual thuggery and partisan one-sidedness”) which has so polarized our nation, and which has led, if only indirectly, to fanning the nihilism of a deluded and mentally unstable young man. (Let us also remember: mentally unstable people, of which our nation has its fair share, are never moved to social acts of self-giving love and forgiveness but to acts of violence either against themselves or against others—acts encouraged by ignorance, intolerance, and hate speech, not to mention our sinfully easy access to dangerous weapons.)

Brooks himself, however, takes no personal responsibility for our present climate of intolerance, hatred, and violence. Instead, he tries to cover his sins, and by implication Palin’s, with high-sounding phrases and biblical language while pointing his finger at others, and incredibly, even concluding his remarks by talking about love and forgiveness! It is a virtuoso performance of supreme narcissism, self-righteousness, indifference to human suffering, culpable blindness, and unrepentant sinfulness. His only recommendation for healing the political divide—or starting the process—(and this unmasks his real motives!) is to have a bipartisan “comprehensive tax reform” as a way “to get people [of different political parties] conversing again.” His real agenda is thus unmasked at last: more tax cuts for the wealthy 1% who already own 42.7% of America! Evidently even this incredibly high percentage is not yet sufficient for Brooks and the plutocrats ruling America. They don’t want the majority of the wealth of America—they want all of it!

Krugman, of the NY Times, rightly says that, Obama’s beautiful speech notwithstanding, our politics are and will remain polarized. He is right. And he is right for a reason Brooks (ironically) mentions: sin. It is the pervasive sin of the Right Wingers that has permeated our nation and is now destroying it. The Right-Wing, quite simply, in the most profound biblical sense, is unrepentantly sinful—it worships mammon and not God; it treats the powerless and the poor with outright contempt, forgetting (or ignoring) what Christ says, “What you do unto the least of these you do unto me.”; and ignores blithely Christ’s call to “love and to serve one another,” instead caring only about themselves and their rich friends. So when Brooks mentions “sin,” he isn’t really talking about sin in its biblical sense. For Brooks, “sinners” are all those who disagree with his anti-democratic, plutocratic, and pro-Big Corporation politics.

This is what is so dangerous about the Right Wing: they are morally and spiritually blind and corrupt, blithely and self-righteously subverting every great principle of the Bible, and are implacably anti-Christian. Of course, they pretend to be moral and biblical, as when Brooks facilely quotes a great Protestant theologian, without however ever having understood a single word that he is quoting.

For those who love America’s founding ideals, have deep faith, and selflessly desire to transform our divided and diseased nation into a healthy nation of caring and tolerant individuals, with opportunity for all, knowing all this is brings no consolation, for our nation before our very eyes is self-destructing, with more craziness and violence sure to follow. Being powerless in the face of such pervasive evil now gripping our nation (the theme in the rise and fall of nations), one can only address these issues spiritually. What remains for those who do care about biblical morality, about love of neighbor and about caring for every citizen, are the words—and the warning— of Christ: the axe is now laid to the roots of the tree; and those trees which do not bear good fruit (that is, those who oppose God’s law of selfless love and the caring and helping of others) will be cut down and thrown into unquenchable fire. This, after all is said and done, is the final lesson, and judgment, of history. God will judge us by our acts of love—and condemn those who work merely selfishly. And that is as it should be.

Len Sive Jr.

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT CONCEALED STALIN’S CRIMES

The world now knows a good portion of what’s worth knowing on the ferocious deeds of the Soviet dictator. The consensus of the historians is that Lenin’s successor put to death or imprisoned several million people. That his victims were more numerous than Hitler’s. In this column we shall deal only with a comparatively minor (on Stalin’s scale) delict: the Katyn extermination of Polish officers, many thousands of them. After Russian president Eltsin handed to Lech Walesa the original order, dated 5 March 1940, to kill all the Polish officers and opposers of communism who were in Soviet hands, no historian nor politician can deny the terrible truth that found in Andrzej Wayda, the director, a tragic witness with his film Katyn.

However many facts are emerging that public opinion still ignores, or is only slowly becoming aware of. For instance, that the British and American governments were informed of the extermination of rightists in Poland since 1942, if not before. Two years later a group of British diplomats signed a secret declaration to the effect that their conscience forbade them to cover said crime for the sake of the war alliance with Moscow. But of course the official position of Washington and London remained unchanged during WW2- the USSR was a brave and noble ally, a stalwart of the glorious crusade against Hitler. President Roosevelt firmly prohibited the divulgation of any news on Stalin’s ‘purges’ and other atrocities, begun in 1923 and become paroxysmal after 1936. The Allied intelligence was perfectly informed of said crimes.

Consequently, after reconquering Smolensk in September 1943, Moscow felt permitted by Washington and London to announce that “the German aggressors had exterminated thousands of Polish officers at Katyn”. No US or British objection was advanced to the Soviet chief prosecutor of the Nurnberg process including the Katyn massacre in the indictment of the German defendants.

But the Machiavellian sheltering ordered by Roosevelt started to end with the president’s death, on April 12, 1945. His successor Harry Truman, whom Roosevelt had handpicked a few months earlier, narrated in his memories that he first thought of reversing the entire filoSoviet policy of the late president while he stood in the Union Station of the capital, waiting for the arrival of the funeral train with the coffin of FDR. Ten days later Truman was recording in his diary “our deteriorating relations with the Soviets”. He instructed Harry Hopkins, the intimate advisor of Roosevelt and Moscow’s best friend in Washington, “to make clear to Uncle Joe Stalin that I knew what I wanted”.

The truth was that the man of the New Deal mistrusted the western coalition’s chances to really prevail on Germany and Japan that deemed it mandatory to save from defeat and reinforce stalinist USSR. President Truman judged that the Soviet Union would have collapsed in 1942 without the immense supplies sent by Roosevelt.

In other words, immediately after the Commander in chief died, the government and the people of the U.S. totally repudiated the war alliance with Russia. Roosevelt had lied to America and to the world on Katyn and on all other Soviet crimes, in order to please Stalin. The FDR’s judgment and policy were suddenly turned upside-down. Stalin became the arch-enemy and a cruel monster, a murderer no less ferocious than Hitler. The USSR appeared as hostile to the West as Carthage was to the imperial republic of Rome. FDR and Churchill had better not suffocated the truth on Katyn and on the Stalinist regime.

However the British war premier was swift in changing his mind on the Russian tyrant: it was he who proclaimed with his Fulton, Missouri, speech the start of the Cold War. For many years on, a third planetary conflict was a terrible menace on humanity- contrary to FDR’s delusions.

Anthony Cobeinsy

America’s Education Failure

The Necessity of Reappropriating Our Cultural Heritage

Thomas Friedman, in his article “U.S.G. and P.T.A.”, highlighted the failure of America’s educational system, and said help was needed from both sides: “top down” from the government (U.S.G.), and “bottom up” from parents and teachers (P.T.A.). He is correct. But we need more than that: We also need to reappropriate our Western culture, which is our national heritage, and without which we can not exist as a country, since all of our ideals, ethics, and mores come from it. Indeed, an important part of our current problems stems from our “cultural amnesia” regarding this irreplaceable intellectual and cultural inheritance—which loss can be seen most graphically in the cynicism, ignorance, selfishness, and mean-spiritedness now running, and ruining, our nation whole and entire.

The Tea Party is the culmination of a degenerate politics since the multiple assassinations in the 1960’s of Martin Luther King, Jr, John F. Kennedy, and his brother, Robert F. Kennedy. These killings, we now know, were political assassinations carried out by the US government through the initiative, knowledge, and support of the wealthy one percent, in order to stifle in America the basic values inherent in Western culture and Christianity, i.e., economic assistance to minorities, the poor, the elderly, and the sick—along with other initiatives to make society as a whole fairer and more equitable; and on the other hand, not to allow large corporations to run roughshod over Americans or America, which, under JFK, meant concretely, among other things, not to get dragged into the Viet Nam war, for which Corporate America and the military lobbied so insistently. In hindsight we can now see what have been the tragic consequences of the deaths of these three great Americans: numerous, costly, and debilitating wars; an absolutist Corporate State; economic decline and hardship for 84% of Americans; a degenerating, and increasingly malfunctioning infrastructure; an inadequate and expensive health care system (now, under Obama, finally about to be improved, unless stopped again by Republicans); a grossly inferior, and deteriorating, public school system; no relief from our dependence on fossil fuels (and therefore our continuing engagement in the Middle East); environmental catastrophes one after another; little progress in trying to stop global warming; the loss of America’s prestige, honor, and influence through unjust wars and the mistreatment and torture of prisoners; and a new “banana republic” status due to an unbelievably high income disparity. These are both the intended and unintended effects of the assassinations—the intended effects welcomed by Tea Party people and Conservatives (Republicans mostly, but also some Democrats).

But mere “structural changes” won’t effect ini themselves a change in America or how it is governed. We need to probe deeper. We need to return to our cultural, intellectual, and spiritual heritage, to the Greeks and Romans, and also, in an informed and spiritual manner, to our Bible, to reappropriate the history and foundational ideas of Western culture—to enflame our hearts once more with the highest ideals, from Moses and Homer on down, which have inspired men to strive for wisdom, goodness, truth, and beauty, no matter the cost. From these historic Western ideals have sprung new ideas of governance, of how citizens ought to behave towards one another, and of how the state ought to act. Just compare, for example, a Saudi Arabia or China or Russia—their governments, and how they treat their citizens—with any modern Western state, and we see how profoundly important our Western cultural heritage really is.

In part, this renewing of the Western mind and soul will need, as an aid, a return to the classical languages of Hebrew, Greek, and Latin; for a full and profound appropriation cannot be accomplished without a knowledge of the sources speaking in their original tongues. A classical and liberal arts education is, I know, hardly a fashionable prescription, though a necessary one. For language is more than a cultural artifact: it is the only means by which a culture can be effectively appropriated. For our nation, in these troubled times, it would be a decided boon: instead of a distorted, false, and propagandistic Fox News, for example, we could read for instruction our Genesis, Isaiah, or John; instead of the empty and mindless entertainment offered on TV, computers, and cell phones, we could be enriched, deepened, and delighted by Herodotus, Sophocles, or Shakespeare; and instead of listening to the empty and twisted sophistry of a Palin or Beck, we could hear the wise and sonorous counsels of a Plato, a St. Paul, or a Cicero. In this educational reform hearkening back to our cultural roots, then, there would be much to be gained and nothing lost—except our cynicism, our ignorance, our empty pride, and our (Republican) uncharitable hearts.

America is at an historic crossroads. We can embrace fanatics and lunatics, like the Tea Party, and go down to destruction—or we can be renourished and sustained by the historic wisdom of our Western culture, and thrive both individually and collectively. But we cannot do both.

Len Sive, Daily Babel